Behind the Shadows w/ Harvey Guillen
Behind the Shadows w/ Harvey Guillen

Season 4, Episode 10 · 2 months ago

Sunrise, Sunset w/ Mark Proksch

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Today's guest is Baby Colin Robinson himself, tapping into our hearts. It's Mark Proksch. Discover how Mark chooses his iconic roles in Shadows, The Office, and Better Call Saul. And why does Mark choose not to do any preparation for his scenes in What We Do in the Shadows? Find out on a very special episode of Behind the Shadows.

From Straw Hut Media 

Straw media. M welcome to another episode of behind the shadows. I'm your host, hard agae in a k La Cruz. Today's guest is baby Colin Robinson himself, tapping into our hearts. It's mark prooks. Discover how mark chooses his iconic roles in shadows. The office and Better Call Sal and why does mark choose not to do any preparation for his scenes and what we do in the shadows. Find out a very special episode of behind the shadows breathing. It's so overwhelming heart bizzar had so tell me. Why would anyone want to be live deaf man hair reputation before she arrives? But Trust me, we have way more fun in the after line. We have way more funny after line. Okay, guys, we're back for another episode of behind the shadows. I am super excited for our big finale guests, the one, the only, my friend Mark Porch. Yeah, that's that actually got me. Uh, Mark, uh. First of all, this has been such a cool year for Colin the trajectory of the story. But before we get to that, I want to talk about how you got started in acting. Can you tell us a little bit about how you got started in the acting world. Yeah, I did a well, I guess now it would be called a viral video, a series of viral videos that I had never intended to be viral. Um. What I did was I booked myself on these morning shows. Um. And I would go on these morning shows and they had no idea that I was playing a character and I was doing this to make my friends laugh. And so I booked myself as this Yo Yo champion coming to area schools to teach kids about the environment through the use of my Yo Yo and Um, which makes no sense, um, but it had all these things that morning shows love. It had, you know, local interest, it had a hot button topic like environmentalism and it had a demonstration. And so my friend Uh and I sent out twelve press releases to Um morning shows throughout the Midwest and by the end of the day we had ten bookings and I did, I think, about seven before these news stations start to talking to each other and saying, did you have this weird idiot come and do this interview with you? Um. And people started uploading these videos, Um, onto youtube and dead spin, which was a big sports site, picked it up and the writers on various TV shows were watching these and the writers from the office, Um, I would watch them during their lunch and Um, my now wife, who was a writer on the office Um, had just started working like two weeks ago, and so she was bound and determined to figure out who I was, and she did figure out who I was. The writers, Paul Lieberstein, who played it, played toby on the office, called me. He was running the show at the time and they flew me out to meet with all the writers and a month later...

I was on the show. That's incredible, insane, and we'll we'll insert video here because I'm sure we can. Here you go. Welcome back to good morning four states. It is finally Friday morning. Case strass is back with this again from zips APP. We thank you for joining us this morning. You've got your hands full of Yo Yo's right now. You got to what four Yo Yos per hand right, right, and what I do is, uh, it's called the Blue Flying Angel. It's like to get out of the way for this. Yes, you do. Um, you know what we do, or I'll do, is the kids. I'll get into the room and the kids will be running around and I'll be all excited, and so I tried to start things off on their level and try to hook them with something like a rapay. So it's Um and it's kind of clever because it includes me, Um, and it goes, Hey, they're up in the sky. It's the case stross the Yo your guy, and then I do that. Do, do, do, do, Yo, Yo Yo, you know, and I get them going and I get them into it, and so when once I do that, they are ready to learn. And there it is. That's what it was. Uh, I can't well why. I see your videos and I I thought you were a real yo Yo structor until until you see this guy you know repeatedly not do a good job at it and you keep such a straight phase, which is what I think is so great about your comic timing and ability. Is that like I can't tell when you're being serious or you're doing a bit, because you keep grounded and you always keep grounded and never show either way that you're like doing a bit or not. And so sometimes I feel like you funk with my mind sometimes because you know that you're on purposely like talking to me about something, and you you go into like a calling mannerism and then I'm like are you you? And you're like what, what are you talking about? And it's just like you're so good at keeping it grounded, which is hard for Comedians to do, and you do it so so well. And Uh, and and and my question, I guess, is, were you just always like that natural, like funny growing up? Are you like the funny the funny guy at school or well, that's very kind of you to say, Um, and I've said it often that you're my favorite straight man I've ever hearked, because you you just I can bounce anything off of you and you know how to react, and so I love that Um about you. That's very nice. It's true, though. I think we have, uh. Yeah, we've had some really great moments this season, Um, very tender moments of like co parenting with laslow and raising you. Uh. It's just one of my favorite moments playing baseball with you this season and and you being a teenager, but like not getting and ship and you're just like some of some of them. Your delivery. Sometimes it's just like I can't, it's hard to make me break on set like I can't. I'm usually pretty good, and it's you this season there's a couple of takes that like I just had to like cover my face to the side because it's like your face in character as as a teenage Colin Robinson delivering this dry like what was the line in the baseball is like base is sucking, stupid or something like. This is something ridiculous where you just added it and it just like made me break. And and it's hard to do because it's, like you said, playing a straight guy on a straight man on the show is uh is. You know, it's pretty hard just because you guys are so funny, but you really kind of take it to the next level this season. and Um, but going back to the question, were you always the funny guy at school? You've known as that, Um. I mean I wasn't like the class clion, um I. I always enjoyed comedy a lot, Um,...

...and that was clearly where my talents, if any, uh, lied. I. I you know, I have I have funny brothers. I have three older brothers and they're very funny. My Mom and dad are very funny. Um, my grandparents were very funny. So it was, you know, comedy was a big part of my upbringing and had family gatherings and stuff like that. We would always be laughing, Um, and I, you know, I I would make short stupid videos with my friends in middle school and high school and stuff, and I knew that's what I really would want to do if I ever could. But my family had no idea of anything having to do with Hollywood. I mean we didn't have an adjacent ulcohol or anyone that had any UM, knowledge. There was no pathway really for me. Um, I would have to have had the confidence and the ego to just say I'm going to Hollywood, and I never had that. I mean, growing up in the Midwest, you know, ego is the eleventh commandment that you're not supposed to have, and so, Um, I just fell into that backwards. Um, but I didn't, you know, I didn't really take much stata or anything like that. I didn't go to I don't have formal training and it, you know, sometimes I think that shows, unfortunately. But Um, um. But the comedy I'm pretty confident I can do. Yeah, well, you do very, very, very well. We have. And the idea that this season, I mean when you got to do is of Colin Robinson, obviously, you know, dying last season of the end of season three, when you were told that he was gonna be reborn. What did you think? What was what was going through your head, like, how's that going to happen, or what were you thinking? Yeah, I mean I was scared at first because you don't want to ruin you don't want your character to be the reason people stop liking the show, and when you say, Oh, we're going to turn one of the main cast members into a baby, you know that that's kind of hard to swallow at first. The the same in grace was that our show is a cartoon, basically, and anything can happen because we're dealing with, you know, vampires and Goblins and anything. So there was some leeway story to suspend one's disbelief a little bit with regard to that. The other thing thing that I knew couldn't fail was the writing, as we've talked about many times. Um, I think we have the best comedy writers in the in the game right now, um working on our show, and so I figured it was up to me to ruin this Um and I just, you know, I worked at it. I, as you know, like we come to set and we UM, unless it's a serious scene. I personally don't prepare much, and I do that for a reason, and that's so when I get on set, I because it's a mockumentary. If this was better called Saul, I rehearsed the ship out of that Um, backwards and forwards, Um. But with this I want there to be the UMS and Oz and injected as I'm trying to think of the next line or think of how I'm going...

...to do the next bit, because I feel like as a documentary, you want to look real and unrehearsed and and the same with our Improv and I know you do the same. We don't come to set already having Improv worked out in our minds, um, because then it would just seem faith Um. And and so I I was concerned with doing the baby part because there wasn't going to be that level of Improv um that we're so comfortable doing, because of what I did was on a green screen and you guys already had your lines Um filmed, and so I'm reacting to something that's already set in stone. Um. So that was a bit of a challenge to yeah, hopefully, hopefully it worked. Yeah, I was gonna say that was probably the most thing that we that we missed, is that, you know, being on set with each other, we can actually have an Improv in the moment and because Baby Colin is played by, uh, you know, we have young actors who played the tangible body and and and head of you, and then we put dots on their faces and so then you're putting to green screen into this and so we really can improvise as much as we could when it's already set in stone, like you said, and then you're like, Oh man, that would have been a fun a bit to do with Baby Colin back and forth, but we didn't get that because of technology and because of the actual way that the shooting schedule would go. But I think you can out perfect because in a way, Baby Colin is growing, developing and all the adults around him are trying to figure out how to raise this child and which, you know, what is taking places at nurture versus nature or you know, or vice versa, and so it's the adults dealing with this child and Colin living in the in their own sweet world. It's kind of its own thing that you kind of created, where he cares about musicals and Legos, and kind of that's a child. Like a child is always just involving like the world they've created for themselves, that really don't know about what's going on around them. They're aware and they're smart, they can listen, but they create their own world, you know. And Uh, and I think that kind of worked in our favor with the baby Colin especially. I love that he loves musicals. Yeah, and that's you know, that's a storyline I've wanted to have for Colin. Is Theater on some level, and musical theater, which I personally love, Um, and I think we all love on the show, and Paul Simms has confessed his love for musical theater. Um. But it's such a fun target. At the same time, even when you're in musical theater, I think it's you know, you can take it with Um, a little tongue in cheek sometimes, and that's great. That's what it should be. Um. It's a huge spectacle and I've always wanted Colin to kind of move into that arena Um, and so I was really excited that when I found out that he was going to be doing song and dance Um and I would actually get to sing and stuff like that. Um, that was exciting. I I going back to the improvisation. I think you're a D percent right. I think the fact that playing Colin as a baby was so confining is a good thing, because children, Baby Colin, I don't think a doesn't need to drained people to survive, and...

...so I don't think he has the knowledge yet of all these ridiculously boring tangents or an Improv that I, as an adult would put into the character wouldn't fit for the child, and that was something I had to keep in mind um throughout filming. Was this isn't mark trooks playing this character and me throwing in something that I find funny. It's Mark Crooks playing this character that's a top a tween, and that tween doesn't have, you know, the the years on him to be able to draw on certain topics or jokes and put them in Um. So that confinement actually, I think you're right worked. I think so. I think it it's very sweet. People are a lot of fans are have made, throughout the season, really beautiful fan art of what they've quoted. Uh, it's Baby Colin and and Theo memo or uncle memo, because Guienimo kind of takes on the more maternal Um role in the relationship, with co parenting with laslow and and lets you be who you want to be and encourages you and and and and our our team, marketing team and and and social team has done a great job. If you go to actual Colin Robinson's or Baby Collins Youtube page, you can't actually look at the videos and like them and you'll see that a lot of the comments are actually guietimost comments. Give you baby like Lagos are fun. Good, good job, buddy, like they did such a great job of like really kind of continuing the storyline of like that. You always have that one parent who's really encouraging and the parent who's not as with that, because, remember, the last was not big on the art of not musical theater. It's for half wits, that's what he calls it. Uh. But but the idea that these two men are raising you as a child and what will come of it is what we see at the final conclusion of the episode of season of four. Um. It's just it's kind of great, you know, like the story that we just told through a comedy, which is so great. It's just like how do you raise a child, you know, what does it take? A Village Who's part of UH. Do you have any fond memories when you were a child that you that you just think are like wow, that was just a special moment that kind of helped me or guided me or or will live with me just because it just it was so good in itself and what it was. Yeah, you know, I it's hard to point to just one specific one, but my my grandma, one of my grandma's, was very into the arts and Um, you know, she did community theater and community musical theater, and when I was very young, six or seven, she started bringing me in Um to the cast Um, and so I would play like kid number thirty seven in sound of music or the music man or what have you, and that experience, Um was really, I think, invaluable for me because at that early of an age it taught me not to be scared in front of audiences, because at that age you don't really know to be scared in front of large groups of people. Um, and she she was always very, very funny, like for the sound of music, she played mother superior and she went to a a photographer and then...

...had head shot. Well, not head shots but like, you know, photos that you give to relatives. And so for Christmas she gave out all these photos of her in a nun's costume. Um. And you know, she was just that type of person. Um. And you know, I have great parents. I was very lucky. Um, I'm very lucky to have supportive parents that you know, we're hardworking, very hard working, Um, and good models. Um. And taught me very young that life isn't fair, and I think a lot of kids don't get taught that lesson anymore. Um, now I sound like an old GRANDPA, but but it's true. Yeah, and I think you know, they were also, you know, they were very loving, but also there was discipline if you screwed up. And I think as a kid you think your parents hate you or you hate your parents or what have you because of that, um. But then as you get older, you realize, Um, that it's a really delicate balance and hopefully your parents, are parents or guardian was able to thread that needle. What is the something you might be able to share that? What's one time that you screwed up? They need to be like disciplined, like it's like did you steal the car? No one. I remember was I cut my own hair as and this is the more what did you do? Well, yeah, yeah, I had I only know. It was so traumatizing. I went both Um. Now, I must have been four or five. I was very young and I cut my hair and should not be using scissors at four or five, right, that's through number one. You will that. But also you should be cutting your own hair at four five, Um, and boy, I got in trouble for that. I got a spanking for that for sure. And then there was another time where I had I always, I would always get your infections as a kid. I never had the tubes put in, but I always got your infections and the the liquid penictillin. It's like the pink if I remember correctly. Um, I had to take that and I remember Um again, I was like five or six. I remember thinking it kind of looked like blood, and so my mom would give it to me and I would keep it in my mouth and then I would just go out in the garage, not even out in the yard, like an intelligent kid would, and I would act like Nye and I would like have it, and here it's medicine. I'm supposed to be taking Um and then my mom one day came out and she just saw the pink on the ground and put two and two together. My mom was always good at like figuring out, okay, what did this idiot just do, and then tying the pieces together and why? Um. She was always very good at very good about that. The penicilla you're supposed to be taking for your ear infection to make you feel better. You're not taking and using it as prop blood out of your mouth. Yeah, and and we weren't wealthy and we didn't grow that's money, I mean we were lower middle class and so like that's money, you know, that's a lot. That's an...

...doctors visit and that's, you know, prescription. Oh my gosh, I mean those are good ones. I mean and you grew up in the Midwest, you said. Was it? Yeah, and UH did. I mean, I was just imagined like in the middle of winter, with that medicine, just like freeze over in the floor of a garage and just leave a a pink residue on the on the cement floor. You can be sure. You so mark. This year we got to go to comic con and we filled up hall H, which is crazy to think of, because that was a massive, massive, massive audience and we were full. We have people who told US afterwards that they try to go in and there are a capacity and security guards weren't let them in, that they were that packed and that many people. What was that experience like? What was comic con like for you this year, and what was it like to see your character, uh, for cosplay? We saw so many Conn robins is walking around and what was that like? Did you did you think that would ever happen? Your characters will be cosplayed at a comic con? No, no, I mean it's it's as as you know, when you're filming a show, especially this one, which we film in Toronto in the dead of winter. Um, the last couple of years we haven't been able to really go anywhere because of covid during production, and so it becomes very insular and you forget that you even have fans, Um, that are waiting on this product or are excited to see this product, because you are just so focused on going to work, going to work and coming home and eating and sleeping so you're prepared for the next day, Um, and and then to go to comic con, which is just such a rewarding experience because you see the fruits of that Labor and you meet people who are so incredibly invested in the show and are so are our fans are really really kind and very creative people, Um, and you see that in the artwork that they they sent us. You see that in the costumes that they create themselves. Um. So, to be honest, show that takes on a life of its own amongst the fans is really incredible and very rare in this day and age where there's five thousand shows and, uh, five million actors on those shows. Yeah, it was. You're right, it was. You know, we we started the show, uh, and we premiered season two right before or this whole thing with pandemic happening, and we kind of went away and just did the work and and and did a couple of seasons, but we really hadn't been out and about and kind of seeing how much the show have been well received. And so, Um, I knew we're going to comic car. I knew we had fans because they've been so lovely to share their their art online and tag us and whatnot, but I had no idea that it was that kind of you know, massive well received and it was just like it blew my mind, like I was just like wow, this is this is really insane and really awesome. And we think all those fans who who dressed up, who come and support us, who came from around the world. Some people, you know, traveled around the world to go to Sanuel Comic Cont to maybe get a glimpse of us, and we went on and said hi to everyone and and it just blew my mind like it was just so many wonderful people who love this show. And and now people know how how, how many of us it takes to make the show happen. It's just not the actors, obviously, but we have an amazing team of writers and producers and costume designers...

...and, Um, all the whole team that just that gets this thing and it's great to see them getting acknowledged now. You know words, yeah, we've got nominations for costume, for stunt. We got to we got two notches for writing. We got the nomination for comedy, which is Great, and then, Um, it's just, yeah, it's just it's it's always just a cherry on top everything. You think you've got the sprinkle done and the Cherry and the whip cream. It's always like, oh, there's something else that's just at it that makes it even sweeter and richer. I guess you could say, Um, you've had such a great career just the office and Better Call Sal and this show. Are you really particular about the roles that you you want to play going forward? Are you like, as long as it's funny, what's your role thumb? Usually when you play a role, for better for worse, I've always been very particular. Um. I feel like you owe that to your fan base. Um. I I've as a huge fan of television and movies and certain actors. I've I felt personally let down when an actor who I loved and thought was, Um, very considerate with their choices chooses some awful stupid movie or some awful, Um silly TV show. I think that it's not rational of me to feel that way. I understand that, um, but we do have some control, um, and it's hard when you're starting out, um, because you need money and it's it's incredibly hard to be choosy and picky. Um. Looking back, there maybe one or two things I wouldn't have done, but I'm not embarrassed by those. There's still decent things, UM, decent products. Um, you have to pay the bills, Um. But yeah, I think, I think you owe that to your fan base. Um, and I think it helps your career in the long run. Um, being a bit choosy. m. You don't want to overstay your welcome. You know I'll wear out your welcome and you don't want to be overexposed and as character actors that can happen very quickly, I think. Um, and yeah, I am a little picky. And again, like, it's hard sometimes early on, especially when you do you know, I'd be on the office and you have friends who think, Oh, you're on TV now you're rich. Well, no, you go on. I was a reoccurring on the office and so I might get one paycheck for that for a month, for two months of one episode, and that was that. One episode paid me like what I made it for two weeks at my temping job. And so it's not like all of a sudden you have just sacks of money handed to you. Um, and so you you scrounge and you you work really hard, Um, and so to be choosy during those times it's especially hard. Yeah, I mean you do put a lot of work. You do. You put a lot of work into the character development of the characters that you do. So yeah, it is it does pay off to be, uh, you...

...know, selective and and all of that, and it is part of what you want to present in your brand. You know, what you want to be proud of. Obviously, Um. You know, for this character, what kind of preparation for a Colin Um, which is the first of its kind and I never see on television, really is an energy vampire? What kind of preparation did you go into to fall into Colin's mindset? I like playing the Weirdos. I like playing the Um, a bit eccentric, should I be, kind of annoying characters, because that's who I enjoy in real life. That's who I like on the you know, on the shuttle at the airport, will strike a conversation with or UM and standing in line at the DMV or what have you. I love to talk to them and and just they're far more interesting and far more Um, AH, fun to hear out then say, just another person that looks like me, Um and talks like me. Um. And so with Colin it was a lot of I'll record people sometimes when I'm when I'm talking with them or if they're going on a rant with some other person. I'll just flip on my voice memo and then listen back to that a little bit. Um, not to be intrusive, but just to really figure out what their mindset is and then try to get into that mindset a little bit when I'm doing a character. Um. But that's about it for preparation. I try to really hear what the writers want. Um. And on our show we we were given the privilege of flexibility with our characters to a certain degree. They weren't set in stone necessarily. Um. Jermaine, especially early on, made us aware of that and wanted a great deal of improvisation. Um. And I think your character develops over that time. It's always fun to watch the first season of a of a show and then on the seventh season go back and rewatch that first season because you see that character develop a great deal. Um. And that I feel like it's happened with all of us. We've gotten very comfortable playing these characters. We know them backwards and forwards, and the the minimal preparation I did ahead of time a lot of that probably went um to the side as I figured out the character and as the writers developed the character. I mean it's been a great season and it's been a great I mean Colin has always been one of my favorites and now this really kind of takes the Cherry on top, which is like with Baby Colin. Has Been such a great season, such a great journey we had. Nausea is also the club, and we weren't asking all our guests if you had a drink for Colin at nausea's, what would the drink be called and what would it be made out of? Oh my gosh, that is a hard one, and it could be obviously a human drink, so for human consumption. But like, what would it be name and what would the ingredients be for it? I think it would be called Colin's drain pain Um, because he would want to play on the main vein euphemism to be annoying and gross, and it would probably be...

...a lot of apple all and a lot of Marischino Cherry tubes and Um, a lot, a lot of decoration on top. Uh, so much so that it's incredibly annoying because it poke you like there's no straw like you have to actually put the Cup to your mouth. Oh, yeah, you have to drink straw all the yeah, and there's like, you know, Pineapple Rind, there's just and stuff that you don't want in it and there's a giant piece of like, you know, like tricky Bacon wrapped around Asparre, I guess this. Yeah, stuff that you don't and it's just poking your eyes. You can't even get to the drink. You can't even get to the actual feverage. Yeah, no, you don't. You order it and then the bar is filled with me at the end of the night because no one touched them after they just at the edge at the end of the bar. Just collect that at the corner. People just leave them. Oh my gosh. Well, mark, thanks so much for joining us. This has been an absolute pleasure. Than you. I love this season. This has been one of my favorites, the story and you're killing it this scene. Literally, I'm just killing that is my favorite fight scene so far. And Uh and UH, one of my favorites. And here's to another two seasons, season five and season six, coming your way everyone. We're excited. Is there anything you want to tell the fans? Mark who've been a supporter of the show from the beginning and continue to love and can totally, totally ship Colin Matters. Yeah, I just ad Uh hearted thank you and a failing of gratitude. Um, we know this doesn't happen often, that fans get this involved and it's excited about a show and hopefully we can keep making you laughter and they's very, very ridiculous times. Well, you heard it here, folks. Thanks so much for watching and we'll see you next season. Behind the shadows as a production of Straw hut media, hosted by Harvey Gian, produced by Ryan Tillotson, Amda Sanchez and Tyler Nielsen, original music by Trevor Bumgar and Chris Hendricks, vocals by Maggie Glass. If you don't already, subscribe wherever you're listening and make sure to follow behind the shadows podcast on instagram for more behind the scenes content and tune in live every Thursday at one pm Pacific on the what we do in the shadows. subredit for an a m a with Harvey and special guests. Would anyone want to be alive? Death might have her reputation before she arrives, but trust me, we have way more fun in the after line. We have way more fun on the after line. See you next week.

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